One thing that every pattern has is a yarn recommendation under supplies. And every single knitter at one time or another has looked at that yarn recommendation and said, “Nope, I’m using another brand.” But which brand to use if you want the same outcome as the designer? There aren’t hard and fast rules, but I made a few guidelines for you. Have the pattern handy because you’re going to most of your information from the pattern supplies. Weight. Typically,… Read more »

Here are a few facts I know about stranded/fair isle colorwork: It’s really pretty, it’s not as hard or as intimidating as it looks, and I’m not an expert so I’m going to give you some of my tips, but I’m also going to link to people who know a lot more than I do! 1. Color Dominance and Hand Placement. When you’re stranded knitting, you hold at least 2 colors of yarn in your hands for the entire row. Because… Read more »

As you may have noticed, I am a huge fan of making garments. It’s wonderful to have total control over the clothing I’m wearing, from the materials to the fit. Some people want to take the plunge and make garments, but I always hear hesitations like: 1. I’m afraid it won’t fit. 2. I’m don’t want to waste money if it doesn’t work out. 3. I don’t know what I’m doing. Now, only you can determine what projects are at your skill… Read more »

If you’re a beginner knitter, most of your focus is on making sure you complete your knit or purl stitches, but fairly quickly, you’ll wonder why your knitting is so uneven, lopsided, and doesn’t look like knitting in a lot of pictures on the internet. If you’re not sure what tension is, or how to achieve a “proper” tension, check out my video here. (And a bonus: Franklin makes an appearance to play with some yarn demonstrate how not to… Read more »

Looking over a knitting pattern for the first time can be intimidating or even scary, especially if you’re looking at abbreviations for lifting stitches, cabling, or making bobbles. Sometimes though, even writing out knitting abbreviations like k3, p2, c4b, p2, k3 is too much work, and that’s where knitting charts come in. I don’t know anyone that likes charts and is eager to learn how to read them right away, but they are useful and if it’s a complicated piece of… Read more »

In honor of my latest pattern being released, Lake Diamond, and since a lot of my patterns involve lace in some way, I thought I’d come up with a list of tips for the beginner lace knitter. While knitting lace is certainly a skill that takes a little bit of work, it’s not nearly as intimidating as most people think it is – so here’s my 10 tips for lace knitting. 1. Pay Attention. If you like to zone out when… Read more »

It’s time for a technique video! Double pointed needles are super versatile and can be used on so many projects, but if you’re new to using them, getting started can be a bit of a pain. I’ve put together a little video to show you how to spread out your stitches, begin knitting, and make sure you don’t get those pesky ladders up the sides of your project. Check it out here:

If you’re knitting some cables or lace or colorwork – or if you’re a beginner knitter – you’re familiar with ripping out your work because somehow it doesn’t look like what it’s supposed to look like. While I think ripping out your work can be therapeutic at times, and while it can certainly help you learn to focus, it can also be wildly frustrating. Here’s a simple way to insert a lifeline into your work when you’re knitting so that… Read more »

I don’t know why you learned to knit. Maybe you started knitting as a form of self-care, maybe you wanted to bond with a friend/neighbor/relative, maybe you wanted to knit a blanket for the cutest new kid in your life – whatever the reason, you’re starting to flounder. Knitting was fun, but you have a busy life. “Maybe I’ll have time to knit tomorrow,” you said, nearly a month ago. Meanwhile, when you finally do get back to your knitting, it’s… Read more »

No matter how long you’ve been knitting, dropped stitches are a part of life. I used to rip out my work (EVERY.SINGLE.TIME) until I learned these tricks. The first technique requires a crochet hook. This is helpful, especially if you’re picking up tiny stitches. The second technique is perfect if all you have your two needles – you can still grab and fix most dropped stitches!