Looking over a knitting pattern for the first time can be intimidating or even scary, especially if you’re looking at abbreviations for lifting stitches, cabling, or making bobbles. Sometimes though, even writing out knitting abbreviations like k3, p2, c4b, p2, k3 is too much work, and that’s where knitting charts come in. I don’t know anyone that likes charts and is eager to learn how to read them right away, but they are useful and if it’s a complicated piece of… Read more »

If you’re knitting some cables or lace or colorwork – or if you’re a beginner knitter – you’re familiar with ripping out your work because somehow it doesn’t look like what it’s supposed to look like. While I think ripping out your work can be therapeutic at times, and while it can certainly help you learn to focus, it can also be wildly frustrating. Here’s a simple way to insert a lifeline into your work when you’re knitting so that… Read more »

No matter how long you’ve been knitting, dropped stitches are a part of life. I used to rip out my work (EVERY.SINGLE.TIME) until I learned these tricks. The first technique requires a crochet hook. This is helpful, especially if you’re picking up tiny stitches. The second technique is perfect if all you have your two needles – you can still grab and fix most dropped stitches!

Hey gang, I hope you love my Knitting 101 course. I know that’s probably a bit of a stretch. I’ve seen people pick up the hang of knitting in a few minutes, and I know for me it took nearly 2 weeks before I felt confident that I could knit without screwing the whole thing up. Part of the frustration is that once I felt like I got the hang of the knit stitch… then what? I didn’t feel confident to… Read more »

After you get the knit and purl stitches down, and you’re ready to start on something fun and new: patterns!, you realize you can’t get very far because knits and purls suddenly appear in the same row. Don’t worry! This really isn’t as difficult as it first appears. I’ve put together a quick video that shows you how to make a knit to purl transition, and back again from a purl to knit stitch. It’s just a simple moving of… Read more »

Blocking is the final step in knitting before you can enjoy your newly made item. Like knitting a swatch to check your gauge before you start a project, blocking is something that is easily and often skipped at the end of a project. Blocking relaxes the yarn so you’re able to manipulate and shape it into the desired shape. For example, if you’re knitting a sweater and it’s a little short, you can block it and shape it into the… Read more »

The first time I walked into the yarn aisle at a craft store with the intent to purchase and buy yarn, I was completely overwhelmed! There are baskets upon baskets, and usually multiple rows filled with so many varying colors, thicknesses, and, most importantly to me, varying softness levels. A terrible habit, but one I’ve never been able to break, is slowly walking down the aisle, feeling every skein to determine if it was soft enough to be chosen for… Read more »

A small sample of my needles. Picking out needles for beginners is always tricky. There’s usually a good chance of sticker shock when you first start shopping for needles because they can be pretty pricey. You want something that’s good quality, but cheap, but a nice size because you want to use them again. I’m going to recommend what I think are the best, but I want to warn you that there’s a very small chance you’ll pick them again… Read more »

Knitting can be such a fun hobby and you get fun, warm articles of clothing out of it. But it’s also incredibly frustrating at times, especially when you’re a beginner and you’re ABSOLUTELY SURE that you moved your yarn over so it makes NO SENSE that you have extra stitches. But I’m getting ahead of myself. That fun will come later. Let’s start with the basics. You need yarn. You need needles. You need them fairly cheaply because why spend… Read more »