I don’t know why you learned to knit.

Maybe you started knitting as a form of self-care, maybe you wanted to bond with a friend/neighbor/relative, maybe you wanted to knit a blanket for the cutest new kid in your life – whatever the reason, you’re starting to flounder.

Knitting was fun, but you have a busy life. “Maybe I’ll have time to knit tomorrow,” you said, nearly a month ago.

Meanwhile, when you finally do get back to your knitting, it’s like starting over on day one.

I feel you. It’s no fun looking up tutorials for stitches you knew how to make a week ago.

This post is for you, my super ladies, who try to do it all, including knitting.

These are my favorite places to knit when you have no time.

1. Lunch break. Does anyone still get an hour for their lunch break? I’ve only ever had 30 minutes, which is just enough time to grab something and stuff it in your face, BUT if you’re one of the lucky ones, don’t go back to the office early, hang out on a park bench and get a few rows in.

 

2. Work meetings/conferences. If you have a chill boss, he or she might be happy to let you knit away. (Just explain that it helps you concentrate!) Either way, I know you have phone and web conferences where face time isn’t required. Bam – better listening skills AND you just finished that sleeve.

 

3. Waiting rooms. Waiting can really suck. The best advice I’ve seen is to focus on your breath, be present, and spend some time with yourself, but that’s not always easy to do, especially if you can’t stop thinking about the germs flying across the room from that gross person that can’t stop hacking and coughing. Whether you’re waiting a few minutes or an hour, have your knitting handy.


4. Happy Hours. Okay, a lot of people are uncomfortable with this one. It’s weird to be the only person knitting, especially when everyone’s sharing the latest gossip and trashing that client from hell. But the thing is, in between pounding beers (or tea, depending on the group!), it’s nice to have something to occupy your hands. And trust me, it’s only weird the first time you pull it out. Then everyone thinks you’re that cool girl that will knit them something.

 

5. Movie/TV nights. I’m all about bonding with family and friends, and sometimes that means you all get together, order a pizza or tacos, and watch some TV. It can be fun, but let’s be honest, your friends and family don’t always have the best taste in shows. When it’s not your turn to pick what you watch, grab your knitting. It helps get you through those awful, awful jokes.

 

6. Commuting. If you drive to work, then maybe skip this step. But if you take the train, the subway, a bus, or carpool, you should definitely whip out your needles. There’s really zero point to focusing on the traffic, worrying about if you’re going to be late, or attempting to get a jumpstart on your email – there will always be more emails!

 

7. Sporting events. I’m not going to lie – I really don’t understand the point of a lot of sports. Sure, sometimes it’s exciting, but then there’s 10 minutes of downtime for every 3 minutes of play, and what’s the point of that? But even if you like all that downtime or the atmosphere or whatever brings you there, it’s always nice to have something to do while you’re waiting for game play to resume.

*knits furiously*

 

8. Trains, Planes, and Automobiles. As before, if you’re driving, steering, or in some sort of control, pass on the knitting. But if you’re taking a trip somewhere as a passenger, you have to take your knitting. I know you packed a book, some sudoku puzzles, and even a magazine, but I promise, and you know this, you’re going to get bored with those things after an hour, tops. And then what? Oh gosh, ESPECIALLY if you have a layover. Your coffee and pastry don’t last forever, and you can only watch so many planes take off before your thoughts turn dark and you begin questioning your life decisions while listening to – somehow – the most annoying collection of people ever assembled. (And yes, you can take knitting needles on domestic flights – double check for international ones!)

 

So get to knitting in your free time, and soon you’ll be a champion knitter, and no one will be able to stop you.

 

 

Once you have the stitches down and you feel like a real knitter, you can even justify spending more than $15/skein!

 

 

And then, before you know it, you’ll be old and gray and still knitting projects as awesome as you are.

 

Image result for banksy knitting

 

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33 thoughts on “Top 8 Places to Knit When You Have No Time

  1. Jennifer M

    Thank you for this. Since I take my knitting everywhere and people stare at me like I have 3 heads, I begin to question my knitting in public places. So reading this helped me to calm my fears that I was beginning to think I was crazy, rude, and selfish. Now that I know there are other knitters just like me, I feel so much better! And can now refocus on knitting!

    Reply

    1. kmjones3 Post author

      You’re not crazy, rude, or selfish! I think it’s significantly better than having your head buried in your phone for most of the day – and, besides, there are so many amazing health benefits to knitting and working with your hands in general that I think you’re on the right track! 😀

      Reply

    2. Renny

      Don’t worry Jennifer, I crochet during my commute. And yes, I get looks but I don’t mind at all. Most of the time people look because they can’t do it themselves and are amazed. Be a proud public knitter 😉

      Reply

  2. Spalover

    it always irritates me when I see No. 6 labeled knitting…that man is crocheting…he’s actually quite well published for it all over New York City.

    Reply

  3. Lutheranliar

    Love this! Back in the day, when I was an advertising copywriter, I used to knit on commercial shoots. There is a LOT of sitting around and waiting — for the shot to get set up, for the actors to get out of wardrobe, for the food stylists to do their thing. Speaking of food, it kept me from ravaging the craft services table too (that’s what they call the big spreads od snacks available all day/night, per union rules). I found out, incidentally, that many actors also knit on set, and for the same reasons.

    Reply

    1. kmjones3 Post author

      Ooh, that’s a great place to knit! I worked on set in the tv industry for a few years, but this was before I knew how to knit – that would have been the perfect place!!

      Reply

    1. kmjones3 Post author

      Ha, that’s great! It reminds me of my mother knitting every time she came to a red light – I love it!!

      Reply

  4. miss agnes

    I knit when playing Scrabbles with my family. I noticed that I play better when I knit: the others can take as much time as they want, and when it’s my turn, I’m fully focused. And I get a lot of knitting done. Works with family and friends, too.

    Reply

  5. Gina

    I’m a crocheter, but these ideas apply to us too. I love to crochet in our car, since my Hubby does most of the driving. We live in the country, & there’s only one main road from our town to “the Big City”, so I’ve seen everything along the 45 minute drive a zillion times. So I toss my crocheting into a tote bag (or sometimes just a plastic grocery bag), & off I go.

    Reply

    1. kmjones3 Post author

      They definitely do apply to crochet! Country driving makes so much sense, and that reminds that I need to plan out some knitting for my upcoming road trip…

      Reply

      1. Deborah Hale

        Those reusable .grocery totes are for more than groceries anymore, and they’re CHEAP (plus, as a bonus, you can toss them in the washer if you want to avoid an “icky raw food residue” feeling), it’s actually worth packing up tote bags with patterns and the equipment to make each project. If you get bored with one project, you already have something else. I do this with scarves and baby afghans, and I have a small plastic canister with assorted notions that goes everywhere I do, because you never know what you’ll need. I can clip out a knot and splice yarn on the go if I need to, because I have all the tools on hand.

        Reply

  6. DeeDee

    I also bring knitting to the movie theater. I make sure it’s a small, simple project like a dishcloth, and I feel my way. In addition, it’s four hours to my in-laws, and my husband enjoys driving, so I let him.

    Reply

    1. kmjones3 Post author

      So smart! I wouldn’t think the lighting would work, but if it’s a small project, then it totally would!

      Reply

  7. Karen

    The movie theater is a good place too. I crochet but used a lighted crochet hook. These are all great places to get our projects completed. Whether it’s knitting or crocheting, they both provide the same amazing health benefits and can be performed in the same places. Great article!

    Reply

  8. Pingback: Knitting in Public: Better than Using Your Phone – Knitting

  9. Nanna Sue

    I can’t believe everyone is so surprised by this idea. My mum (1910-1989) knitted everywhere except during church services and I just followed her example. I now sometimes exchange the knitting for some patchwork but my hands are rarely empty and I remain calm when everything around me conspires against me.

    Reply

    1. kmjones3 Post author

      At some point making things fell out of fashion, and now, at least among people my age, it’s really only seen as acceptable to carry and use your phone in public – I think you and your mum have the right idea!

      Reply

  10. Samantha

    There was a group of us who knitted and crocheted in church.

    I also take my knitting to the kids’ after school activities and to the playground.

    Reply

  11. Donna

    While waiting for the school bus in the afternoon. My daughter’s school has a later dismissal and by the time everyone is on the bus and it gets back to the regular high school it ca be 20 -30 minutes. Sometimes more if the alternate driver gets lost.

    Reply

  12. Deborah Hale

    I used to manage an auto parts store that did mostly deliveries (we didn’t get many walk-in customers at all) for auto repair shops and spent a LOT of time knitting (and crocheting). Sometimes when I simply couldn’t bear staring at the four walls anymore I’d take a delivery, but I would have something in the truck with me in case I got stuck by a train or funeral procession or car wreck. And rush hour…yeah, when three cars manage to make it through the light before it turns red again, having yarn and needles beats getting stressed about when I’d make it back to the shop.

    Reply

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